Dolly Parton

'Our little white asses' aren't the only ones that matter

“There’s such a thing as innocent ignorance, and so many of us are guilty of that”

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US PRESS GROUP

Acclaimed country singer and performer Dolly Parton voiced her support for the Black Lives Matter movement in a wide-ranging interview with Billboard.

"Of course Black lives matter," Parton told the magazine. "Do we think our little white asses are the only ones that matter? No!”

She added: “All these good Christian people that are supposed to be such good Christian people, the last thing we’re supposed to do is to judge one another. God is the judge, not us. I just try to be myself. I try to let everybody else be themselves.”

Her comments come a few years after Parton decided to remove the word "Dixie" from the name of her dinner show attraction, now known simply as "The Stampede."

“There’s such a thing as innocent ignorance, and so many of us are guilty of that,” she told Billboard. "When they said ‘Dixie’ was an offensive word, I thought, ‘Well, I don’t want to offend anybody. This is a business. We’ll just call it 'The Stampede.’ As soon as you realize that [something] is a problem, you should fix it. Don’t be a dumbass. That’s where my heart is. I would never dream of hurting anybody on purpose.”

The Black Lives Matter movement became re-galvanized at the end of May after the police killing of George Floyd, an unarmed Black man.

Since then protests have swept across the country. The organization has gained support from Democrats and notoriety with Republicans. Many protests have escalated and resulted in property damage, looting and violence.

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