Border Crisis

Biden strikes international deal in bid to stop migrants reaching US

Officials agree with Mexico, Honduras and Guatemala to step up security

Officials agree with Mexico, Honduras and Guatemala to step up security to try to prevent increased migration at southern border

.uspg
US PRESS GROUP

The Biden administration has struck an agreement with Mexico, Guatemala and Honduras to temporarily increase border security in an effort to stop migrants from reaching the US border. The agreement comes as the US saw a record number of unaccompanied children attempting to cross the border in March, and the largest number of Border Patrol encounters overall with migrants on the southern border – just under 170,000 – since March 2001.

According to White House press secretary Jen Psaki, Mexico will maintain a deployment of about 10,000 troops, while Guatemala has sent 1,500 police and military personnel to its southern border and Honduras deployed 7,000 police and military to its border “to disperse a large contingent of migrants” there.

Guatemala will also set up 12 checkpoints along the migratory route through the country.

Security forces in all three countries have been frequently accused of using excessive violence against migrants, and targeting them for extortion and robbery.

A White House official said Guatemala and Honduras were deploying troops temporarily in response to a large caravan of migrants that was being organized at the end of March. The Mexican government announced an increase in security and its troop deployment in March.

Psaki said that “the objective is to make it more difficult to make the journey, and make crossing the borders more difficult”.

She added that the agreement was the product of “a series of bilateral discussions” between US officials and the governments of the Central American nations. The increase in migrants at the border is becoming one of the major challenges confronting Biden in the early months of his first term.

Migrants from Central America and Mexico are fleeing rampant corruption, organized crime, as well as hunger caused by failing crops and the impact of climate change.

Numbers grew sharply during Trump’s final year in office but further accelerated under Biden, who quickly ended many of his predecessor’s policies, including one that made asylum-seekers wait in Mexico for court hearings in the US.

Mexicans represented the largest proportion of people encountered by the US Border Patrol, and nearly all were single adults. Arrivals of people from Honduras and Guatemala were second and third, respectively, and more than half of the people from those countries were families or children traveling alone.

Read more

FBI raid exposes Giuliani and signals widening criminal search, experts say

The extraordinary FBI raid on Rudy Giuliani’s New York apartment and office has sparked debate about what criminal charges Giuliani may face, and signals a widening criminal investigation into his Ukraine drive to help Trump in 2020 by sullying Joe Biden, former prosecutors say.

Former Ukrainian prosecutor says he was fired for not investigating Hunter Biden

Former Ukrainian Prosecutor General Ruslan Ryaboshapka said in an interview published on Wednesday that he believes he was fired from his position last year for refusing to investigate President Biden’s son Hunter Biden at the request of Rudy Giuliani and former President Trump.

Liz Cheney warns Republicans ‘at turning point’ as she faces removal from leadership

Liz Cheney, the third-most-powerful House Republican, has warned that her party is “at a turning point” as it prepares to try to remove her from leadership for rejecting Donald Trump’s false claims about the election. Writing in a defiant op-ed, published by the Washington Post on Wednesday, the Wyoming Republican told her party that standing with Trump meant undermining the rule of law and risking continued violence. “Trump is seeking to unravel critical elements of our constitutional structure that make democracy work – confidence in the result of elections and the rule of law."

U.S.-Mexico efforts targeting drug cartels have unraveled, top DEA official admits

A senior Drug Enforcement Administration official told NPR efforts to target drug cartels operating inside Mexico have unraveled because of a breakdown in cooperation between law enforcement agencies and militaries in the two countries. "We're willing to share [intelligence] with our counterparts in Mexico but they themselves are too afraid to even engage with us because of repercussions from their own government if they get caught working with DEA," said Matthew Donahue, the DEA's deputy chief of operations.