Business

Josip Heit · G999 · GS Partners

Investigative.One has launched a new online media project www.josiphebdo.com

The U.S. editorial collective "Investigative One" has launched a new online project: www.josiphebdo.com. "We want to shed light on dark business networks and illegal methods," says Kaitlin Jackson, who is overseeing the current project around an alleged cryptocurrency and international fraud network. "International crime syndicates can manipulate opinions, deceive people and grab billions via the Internet. With josiphebdo.com, we want to educate and warn." The project was born out of a merger of several editorial offices in the U.S., Germany, Switzerland and an African investigative journalists' network.

Inflation will make a comeback

Deutsche Bank issues dire economic warning for America

As the world economy awakens from the 15-month slumber caused by the pandemic, Deutsche Bank has launched a series of research articles to spark debate and discussion about pressing post-pandemic economic issues. On June 7, Deutsche Bank issued its first report of the new series, titled “Inflation: The defining macro story of this decade.”

universal basic income (UBI)

Californians on universal basic income paid off debt and got full-time jobs

After receiving $500 per month for two years without rules on how to spend it, 125 people in California paid off debt, got full-time jobs and had “statistically significant improvements” in emotional health, according to a study released Wednesday. The program was the nation’s highest-profile experiment in decades of universal basic income (UBI), an idea that gained national attention when it became a major part of Andrew Yang’s 2020 campaign for president.

Inforwars

Alex Jones seen on leaked video saying he's 'sick' of Donald Trump

Prominent conspiracy theorist and far-right media personality Alex Jones is seen in a newly revealed video complaining about former President Trump and exclaiming that he wished he had never met him.

CPAC

Calls to can Goya Foods grow after CEO Unuane repeats Trump's election lies

Calls for a boycott of Goya beans, chickpeas and other foodstuffs have grown louder after chief executive Robert Unanue made a series of false claims about the presidential election in a speech to the Conservative Political Action Conference, or CPAC, in Florida on Sunday. Unanue has previously courted controversy with praise for Donald Trump, which last year prompted Ivanka Trump to pose, infamously, with a can of Goya beans. Onstage in Orlando, Unanue called Donald Trump “the real, legitimate and still actual president of the United States”.

The Oracle of Omaha

Warren Buffett admits to a rare 'mistake'

In his annual letter to shareholders of Berkshire Hathaway (BRKB), investing guru Warren Buffett disclosed that the company took an $11 billion writedown last year on its 2016 purchase of Precision Castparts, describing it as "a mistake." The 90-year-old billionaire, Berkshire's chairman since 1970, said in the company's annual letter to shareholders that the "ugly" writedown had a simple explanation.

"Go back to China Bitch"

Washington Post denounces abuse of reporter

The Washington Post on Thursday denounced online abuse that targeted one of its reporters after a photo of her speaking with Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska) was shared on Twitter. The attacks on White House correspondent Seung Min Kim came after Huffington Post reporter Igor Bobic on Wednesday shared a photo of Kim showing Murkowski a tweet from Neera Tanden, President Biden's nominee for Office of Management and Budget director, in which Tanden criticized Murkowski.

Oversight Board

Facebook’s ‘Supreme Court’ to receive new powers

The outside group with the final say on whether Donald Trump can be reinstated on Facebook is expected to be given greater powers in the coming months to decide which content is allowed on the world's largest social network, according to Thomas Hughes, administrative director of the so-called Oversight Board.

G999 Josip Heit

Stiftung Warentest: A questionable offer with crypto coin G999

Now the German consumer protection organization Stiftung Warentest has also issued an urgent warning against the professional criminal Josip Heit and his fraud network around the cryptocurrency G999. Particularly fatal in this regard is the statement of the Federal Financial Supervisory Authority (BaFin), which clarified to Finanztest that GSB Gold Standard Banking Corporation AG "does not have a permit to offer banking and/or financial services transactions in Germany."

MyPillow Desaster

Mike Lindell just got sued for $1.3 billion over election conspiracies

Dominion, the voting machine company at the center of baseless election fraud claims by supporters of former President Donald Trump, filed a lawsuit against the MyPillow CEO and his company on Monday for more than $1.3 billion. In a 115-page complaint filed in D.C. federal court, Dominion alleges that Lindell’s conspiracy claims are not the result of an earnest belief in election fraud, but a ploy to sell pillows.

Gold Standard Banking Corporation AG (GSB)

G999 Boss Josip Heit allegedly involved in dirty human trafficking

The public prosecutor's office in Frankfurt is now also investigating the alleged banker Josip Heit. According to the investigators, the Croatian is a key figure in a network of human traffickers operating throughout Europe. Specifically, prosecutors are charging him with promoting prostitution, extortion, coercion, promoting child prostitution, tax evasion and fraud.

CYBERSECURITY

North Korean hackers are 'the world’s leading bank robbers'

Federal prosecutors on Wednesday announced charges against three North Korean government hackers accused of participating in a wide range of cyberattacks, including the destructive 2014 assault on Sony Pictures Entertainment hack, the global WannaCry ransomware attack in 2017 and a range of digital bank heists.

Conservative Media

Rush Limbaugh dead at 70 following battle with cancer

Rush Limbaugh, the conservative media icon who for decades used his perch as the king of talk-radio to shape the politics of both the Republican Party and nation, died Wednesday after a battle with cancer. He was 70 years old. Limbaugh's wife Kathryn made the announcement on his radio show Wednesday.

Donald Trump

New York Prosecutors investigating financial dealings of Manhattan properties

The Manhattan District Attorney’s Office is investigating financial dealings regarding former President Trump’s Manhattan properties, people familiar with the matter told The Wall Street Journal. The newspaper reported that the Manhattan District Attorney’s Office is probing loans that Trump took out for the buildings that were made by subsidiaries of real-estate investment trust Ladder Capital. Ladder Capital has lent Trump over $280 million for the four buildings since 2012, the newspaper reported, citing property records.

G999 Josip Heit

The criminal universe of the alleged cryptocurrency G999

The Romanian Alexandru Cocindau is a coward. He's afraid of getting caught. Now he has produced a fake video that is just as bad as his work as a "blockchain evangelist", "entrepreneur" and "angel investor" (self-promotion). Because even he was not entirely comfortable with his work, he manipulated his voice on the video – but in such a way that the simple technical capabilities of the prosecution exposed him as a character assassin.

Twitter Ban

Twitter says Trump ban is permanent – even if he runs for office again

Donald Trump’s ban from the social media platform Twitter is going to stick even if he runs for the White House again – and even if he won again, a senior executive said on Wednesday. The former president’s permanent block from Twitter is permanent, Twitter’s chief financial officer, Ned Segal, said during an interview on CNBC when he was asked whether Trump’s tweeting privileges could be restored if he ever returns to power.

Facebook

That Donald Trump has not yet been permanently removed is simply cowardly

Facebook finds itself confronted with one of its most consequential content moderation decisions — whether to let former President Trump back on the platform or keep him permanently banned. Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg has left the decision in the hands of Facebook’s fairly new independent oversight body, and the 20-member board’s impending verdict may have effects beyond the fate of Trump’s potential return. The Oversight Board, which functionally launched in the fall, has the power to recommend that Facebook overturn content moderation decisions, as well as to make related policy recommendations.

Smartmatic

Fox Business suddenly cancels 'Lou Dobbs Tonight,' its highest-rated show

Friday night was his final broadcast, a Fox spokesperson told The Los Angeles Times. Fox representatives did not immediately respond to requests for comment, but a source close to Dobbs confirmed that he has been benched by the network.

Dominion Voting Systems

Rudy Giuliani warns against lawsuit: 'I'm just really crazy'

Rudy Giuliani, attorney for former President Donald Trump, responded Monday to a $1.3 billion defamation lawsuit filed against him by Dominion Voting Systems.

Parler CEO John Matze is fired

The dirty truth of the right wing social media network

Parler has fired CEO John Matze just weeks after the conservative social media site was shut down over violent and incendiary posts about the Capitol siege. Matze blamed Rebekah Mercer, the 47-year-old heiress who hired and then fired Steve Bannon at Breitbart, and controls the board. In a memo Matze sent out to staff this week, first obtained by Fox News, he pointedly said that the decision was made by a board 'controlled by Rebekah Mercer'.

Amazon

Jeff Bezos to step down as Amazon CEO, Andy Jassy to take over in Q3

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos will step down later this year, turning over the helm to the company's top cloud executive Andy Jassy, the company announced Tuesday. Bezos will transition to executive chairman of Amazon's board.^

Trump Organization

Eric Trump attacks Scottish politicians for debate on family's golf courses

On the eve of a parliamentary vote on whether an investigation should be ordered into the financing of Donald Trump’s Scottish golf resorts, the former US president’s son has castigated politicians for “advancing their personal agendas”. Eric Trump issued the bulletin as the Scottish parliament prepares to host a debate called by Patrick Harvie, the co-leader of the Scottish Greens. The Trump Organization’s executive vice-president also described Harvie as a “national embarrassment”.

Shortnews

The View

ABC Boss tells McCain and Behar to cool it with personal attacks

Following the latest on-air blowup between Meghan McCain and Joy Behar, ABC News President Kim Godwin called a last-minute meeting with the co-hosts and producers of The View to demand an end to the personal attacks. After Monday’s broadcast that featured McCain and Behar lashing out at each other over antisemitism, ABC reportedly received a flood of calls from viewers pleading with the network to get rid of McCain. Godwin said during the virtual chat that the on-air attacks had become too toxic and do not comport with the direction she wanted for the long-running talk show.

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The View

ABC Boss tells McCain and Behar to cool it with personal attacks

Following the latest on-air blowup between Meghan McCain and Joy Behar, ABC News President Kim Godwin called a last-minute meeting with the co-hosts and producers of The View to demand an end to the personal attacks. After Monday’s broadcast that featured McCain and Behar lashing out at each other over antisemitism, ABC reportedly received a flood of calls from viewers pleading with the network to get rid of McCain. Godwin said during the virtual chat that the on-air attacks had become too toxic and do not comport with the direction she wanted for the long-running talk show.

McCain apparently wasn’t thrilled with the message as she reportedly stormed out of the meeting early because she felt she was being personally “attacked.”

Drama on the set of The View is nothing new, especially since McCain arrived four years ago. While tensions between Behar and the conservative host have simmered for years, McCain has also run afoul of other hosts, prompting a seemingly never-ending stream of behind-the-scenes drama and on-air fireworks.

CNN

Chris Cuomo had ‘inappropriate’ strategy meetings with brother Andrew

CNN has given its primetime host Chris Cuomo a slap on the wrist for taking part in “inappropriate” meetings to advise his brother on how to respond to an onslaught of sexual harassment accusations. According to a Washington Post report, Cuomo joined several conference calls with New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo and his top aides to discuss political strategy.

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CNN

Chris Cuomo had ‘inappropriate’ strategy meetings with brother Andrew

CNN has given its primetime host Chris Cuomo a slap on the wrist for taking part in “inappropriate” meetings to advise his brother on how to respond to an onslaught of sexual harassment accusations. According to a Washington Post report, Cuomo joined several conference calls with New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo and his top aides to discuss political strategy.

Cuomo, one of his brother’s few close confidantes, reportedly told him to remain defiant and even invoked “cancel culture,” a term Gov. Cuomo also used publicly when brushing off the allegations made by a half-dozen women.

CNN told the Post that the meetings were “inappropriate,” and Cuomo had acknowledged as much.

“He will not participate in such conversations going forward,” the network said, but he won’t be disciplined.

Women’s group UltraViolet called on CNN to immediately suspend Cuomo following the Post’s report, adding that the network should also launch an immediate investigation into Cuomo’s involvement in his brother’s effort to dismiss sexual harassment allegations.

“Anything less is unacceptable, and further harms survivors of sexual abuse, who are already disinclined to come forward for fear of retaliation from men in power like the Cuomo brothers,” UltraViolet communications director Bridget Todd added in a statement.

Voltswagen

Volkswagen accidentally posts new company name

Volkswagen on Monday appeared to accidentally announce a rebranding with the new name “Voltswagen,” before quickly removing the press release from its website. On Monday morning, the German automaker posted a statement on its website announcing the “rebranding,” in an apparent shift towards its investment in electric vehicles, before taking it down, USA Today reported. In the release, the automaker said the rebranding is “more than a name change."

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Voltswagen

Volkswagen accidentally posts new company name

Volkswagen on Monday appeared to accidentally announce a rebranding with the new name “Voltswagen,” before quickly removing the press release from its website. On Monday morning, the German automaker posted a statement on its website announcing the “rebranding,” in an apparent shift towards its investment in electric vehicles, before taking it down, USA Today reported. In the release, the automaker said the rebranding is “more than a name change."

"‘Voltswagen’ is a public declaration of the company’s future-forward investment in e-mobility,” the release said, according to USA Today, which saved a photo of the statement before it was removed.

“The new name and branding symbolize the highly-charged forward momentum Voltswagen has put in motion, pursuing a goal of moving all people point-to-point with EVs,” the statement added.

A person familiar with the company’s plans told USA TODAY that Volkswagen is planning on making the change permanently. The source added that the company was not hacked, that the announcement was not a joke, and that it was not a marketing ploy.

Volkswagen’s plans to rebrand come as several automakers are beginning to invest more in electric vehicles. In November, General Motors announced that it was investing $27 billion through 2025 as part of its commitment to electric and autonomous vehicles. Additionally, the company unveiled plans to launch 30 electric vehicles globally by 2025.

Recovery

White House downplays surprising February jobs gain

Top White House officials took little solace in the better-than-expected February jobs report, insisting Friday that the U.S. was far from a full and equitable recovery from the coronavirus pandemic. The February jobs report released Friday showed the U.S. gaining 379,000 jobs last month, nearly double the consensus estimates of economists. The unemployment rate also dropped 0.1 percentage points to 6.2 percent, its lowest level since March 2020, as businesses prepared for a post-pandemic world.

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Recovery

White House downplays surprising February jobs gain

Top White House officials took little solace in the better-than-expected February jobs report, insisting Friday that the U.S. was far from a full and equitable recovery from the coronavirus pandemic. The February jobs report released Friday showed the U.S. gaining 379,000 jobs last month, nearly double the consensus estimates of economists. The unemployment rate also dropped 0.1 percentage points to 6.2 percent, its lowest level since March 2020, as businesses prepared for a post-pandemic world. President Biden’s top advisers, however, sought to spotlight how much economic damage the U.S. needs to repair and shortcomings of the rebound so far as Democrats push a $1.9 trillion aid bill through Congress.

“If you think today's jobs report is ‘good enough,’ then know that at this pace … it would take until April 2023 to get back to where we were in February 2020,” tweeted White House chief of staff Ron Klain.

If you think today's jobs report is "good enough," then know that at this pace (+379,000 jobs/month), it would take until April 2023 to get back to where we were in February 2020.

— Ronald Klain (@WHCOS) March 5, 2021
Even with February’s gain, the U.S. is still 9.5 million jobs short of replacing those lost to the pandemic, and 18 million Americans are on some form of jobless aid, according to the Labor Department. The unemployment rate has also been artificially depressed by the exit of nearly 5 million Americans from the workforce since the onset of the pandemic.

Cecilia Rouse, chair of Biden’s White House Council of Economic Advisers, highlighted in a Friday analysis how Black and Hispanic women have suffered the greatest declines in labor force participation.

“Black women were only 14 percent of the female labor force in February 2020, but have accounted for a disproportionate 26 percent of female labor force dropouts since then,” she wrote. “Hispanic women were only 17 percent of the female labor force in February 2020 but have accounted for 27 percent of the female labor force dropouts.”

The White House’s concerns are shared broadly by economists, who are generally optimistic in the economy’s prospects for 2021 but concerned about the depth of damage yet to be repaired.

“The pace of job growth in February was a pleasant surprise, but it is still too early to get excited,” wrote Nick Bunker, economic research director at Indeed.com.

“At this pace, it will take about four and a half years to get back to where the labor market would have been without the pandemic. Millions of Americans out of work do not have that time,” Bunker wrote.

Even so, Republicans — who are almost unanimously opposed to Biden's relief bill — touted the surprising February jobs gain as proof the recovery is well underway.

"America’s hard work and perseverance during the challenges of the last year are finally being realized, and more Americans are being vaccinated," said Sen. Mike Lee (R-Utah), former chairman of the Joint Economic Committee. "With a third vaccine now available for distribution, expectations are set for a record recovery from the pandemic-induced recession."

COVID-19

CDC signs off on Johnson & Johnson vaccine

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on Sunday formally accepted the recommendation from its advisory panel that Johnson & Johnson's COVID-19 vaccine can be given to people ages 18 and older in the United States. The announcement by CDC Director Rochelle Walensky will allow vaccinations to begin as soon as the doses are received. Walensky called the decision "another milestone toward an end to the pandemic."

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COVID-19

CDC signs off on Johnson & Johnson vaccine

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on Sunday formally accepted the recommendation from its advisory panel that Johnson & Johnson's COVID-19 vaccine can be given to people ages 18 and older in the United States. The announcement by CDC Director Rochelle Walensky will allow vaccinations to begin as soon as the doses are received. Walensky called the decision "another milestone toward an end to the pandemic."

"This vaccine is also another important tool in our toolbox to equitably vaccinate as many people as possible, as quickly as possible," Walensky said in a statement.

A senior administration official told reporters Sunday evening that Johnson & Johnson will ship 3.9 million doses immediately, and vaccine distribution centers will start receiving them as early as Tuesday.

Experts have said the vaccine could be targeted at places like rural communities, health centers or individual physician offices because of its relatively easy storage requirements.

However, senior administration officials said the goal is equitable distribution, and doses will be allocated to states by population, just as the vaccines from Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna are.

Most communities will have doses of all three vaccines, but not every vaccination site will because of limited availability. Officials stressed people should take whatever vaccine is available.

An administration official said the 3.9 million doses are Johnson & Johnson's entire inventory. There will not be any additional deliveries next week, and the official said governors are aware distribution through the early and middle parts of March will be "uneven."

A total 20 million doses of J&J's vaccine will be sent in March, but they will be concentrated more toward the end of the month. The U.S. has paid for 100 million doses, which the company has pledged will be delivered by June.

The U.S. paid more than $1 billion to aid in the manufacturing and delivery of J&J's vaccine. Nearly a year ago, the company also won $465 million in federal funding for vaccine research and development, bringing its U.S. funding total on the project to almost $1.5 billion.

The nation's third coronavirus vaccine arrives days after the United States surpassed 500,000 COVID-19 deaths.

While nursing home deaths have sharply dropped, as have overall cases and deaths, the CDC is warning the decline in new cases has stalled amid a rise in more contagious variants of the virus.

At the same time, governors across the country are lifting coronavirus restrictions, including mask mandates and capacity limits, despite warning signs of a new spike from the virus mutations.

"This third safe, effective COVID-19 vaccine comes at a potentially pivotal time," Walensky said in the statement.

"CDC’s latest data suggest that recent declines in COVID-19 cases may be stalling and potentially leveling off at still very high numbers. That is why it is so critical that we remain vigilant and consistently take all of the mitigation steps we know work to stop the spread of COVID-19 while we work our way toward mass vaccination," Walensky said.