Newsroom

COVID-19: USA

Now, that dark winter looks to have arrived

The United States’ leading infectious disease expert, Dr. Anthony Fauci, warned in a Sunday Meet the Press interview that another surge of Covid-19 cases “super-imposed on that surge that we’re already in” might be coming, in large part due to the Thanksgiving holiday.

340 Million Dollars

Deutsche Bank seeking to offload three Trump loans

Deutsche Bank is aiming to end any financial ties to President Trump after the United States elections due to negative attention the bank has received as a result of the relationship, Reuters reported Tuesday.

Alexander Hillel Treisman a.k.a “Alexander S. Theiss”

19 year old North Carolina man had plans to assassinate Joe Biden

A North Carolina man who was indicted last month on charges of child pornography also had plans to commit a mass shooting during the holidays and assassinate Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden. A federal grand jury indicted 19-year-old Alexander Hillel Treisman a.k.a “Alexander S. Theiss” in September on charges of knowingly possessing an image that contained child pornography, according to the Daily Beast. When authorities investigated Treisman’s electronic devices, they discovered a bounty of disturbing information.

“anarchist jurisdiction”

NYC, Seattle and Portland sue Trump over 'anarchist' designation

New York and its fellow cities branded anarchist jurisdictions by the Trump administration will file a lawsuit challenging a move to pull their federal funds. The Justice Department last month slapped the label on New York, Seattle, and Portland, saying they could lose federal funding because the administration believes they have failed to rein in “violence and destruction of property” on their streets. The “anarchist jurisdiction” designation came after President Trump ordered the DOJ to identify cities that, in his view, were not responding aggressively enough to protests and crime.

Trumps personal attorney

Rudy Giuliani plays at his balls in the new Borat movie

The reputation of Rudy Giuliani could be set for a further blow with the release of highly embarrassing footage in Sacha Baron Cohen’s follow-up to Borat.

Supreme Court justice

Senate to vote Monday to confirm Amy Coney Barrett

The Senate will vote Monday on confirming President Trump's nominee, Judge Amy Coney Barrett, to the Supreme Court. "With regard to the Supreme Court justice ... we'll be voting to confirm justice-to-be Barrett next Monday," Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said during a weekly press conference, confirming the timing of a final vote on her nomination.

'It is serious and intense'

White supremacist domestic terror threat looms large in US

On 6 October Chad Wolf, the acting secretary of homeland security, released his department’s annual assessment of violent threats to the nation. Analysts didn’t have to dig deep into the assessment to discover its alarming content. In a foreword, Wolf wrote that he was “particularly concerned about white supremacist violent extremists who have been exceptionally lethal in their abhorrent, targeted attacks in recent years. [They] seek to force ideological change in the United States through violence, death, and destruction.”

Donald Trump Rape

DOJ says Trump can't be sued for denying rape accusation

Attorneys for the Department of Justice (DOJ) argued Monday that President Trump cannot be sued for denying writer E. Jean Carroll’s rape accusation because he dismissed her claims in his official capacity at The White House. The lawyers also argued in a court filing obtained by The New York Times that Attorney General William Barr’s move to get the department involved in Carroll’s defamation lawsuit was appropriate.

COVID-19

NYPD arrests orthodox jew Harold "Heshy" Tischler

Harold "Heshy" Tischler, a high-profile Orthodox Jewish activist, was arrested Sunday night on charges related to inciting a riot and assaulting a journalist. "The New York City Police Department Warrant Squad has taken Harold 'Heshy' Tischler into custody. He will be charged with inciting to riot and unlawful imprisonment in connection with an assault of a journalist that took place on October 7, 2020 in Brooklyn," the NYPD said on Twitter. Jacob Kornbluh, a reporter for Jewish Insider, said that he was "brutally assaulted" on Wednesday after Tischler recognized him.

supreme court justice

Gloves come off early in Barrett confirmation hearing

Senators are clashing during the first day of the Supreme Court confirmation hearings, setting up early battle lines as tensions run high just weeks before the Nov. 3 elections. Judge Amy Coney Barrett is appearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee for the first time as part of her confirmation process to succeed the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. With the Q&A portion of the hearing not slated to start until Tuesday, senators spent nearly three hours on Monday morning taking shots at each other.

Gretchen Whitmer

Six people charged in plot to kidnap Michigan governor

Six people have been been charged with plotting to kidnap the Michigan governor, Gretchen Whitmer, that involves links to a rightwing militia group, the FBI announced. Additionally another seven people were charged with plotting to target law enforcement and attack the state capitol building. The state attorney general, Dana Nessel, announced additional charges under Michigan’s anti-terrorism law. Seven men, all in custody, are linked to the militia group Wolverine Watchmen. They are suspected of attempting to identify the homes of law enforcement officers to “target them, made threats of violence intended to instigate a civil war”.

Black Live Matter

Grand jury indicts couple who pointed guns at protesters

A grand jury in St. Louis on Tuesday indicted Mark and Patricia McCloskey on counts of exhibiting a weapon and tampering with evidence four months after footage circulated showing the couple pointing guns at Black Lives Matter protesters outside their home.

18 Republicans vote against it

House approves measure condemning QAnon

The House passed a bipartisan resolution condemning the sprawling QAnon conspiracy theory, though 18 Republican lawmakers voted against the measure in the 371-18 vote. Another GOP lawmaker voted present. President Trump has not condemned he QAnon conspiracy, which revolves around the baseless theory that Trump and his allies are working to expose a cabal of Democrats, media figures and celebrities who are running an international child trafficking ring.

WALL STREET BANKER

Can Donald Trump pay his 1,1 billion in debt?

Well, that was certainly one way to knock the devastating New York Times bombshell story of Donald Trump, tax cheat, off front pages and out of television control rooms. Even so, Chris Wallace, the beleaguered debate moderator, did manage to ask Trump whether it was in fact true that he had paid just $750 in federal income taxes for both 2016 and 2017, as the Times reported. Trump’s answer, which was most certainly a lie? That he paid “millions of dollars” in federal taxes in those years.

Donald Trump Six key findings

The New York Times' Trump taxes bombshell

The publication of Donald Trump’s records by the New York Times is one of the biggest bombshells to hit an unprecedented 2020 election campaign already been hit by a litany of scandals, a bitter fight over a supreme court nomination and a pandemic in which 7m Americans have been infected and more than 200,000 have died, during a bungled federal response.

Civil War

DOJ designates New York as permitting 'anarchy'

The Justice Department announced Monday that New York City, Seattle and Portland, Ore., would be designated as jurisdictions "permitting violence and destruction of property" under President Trump's early-September order requiring federal agencies to submit potential funding cuts for cities "permitting anarchy." In a statement, the agency hit leaders of the three cities for rejecting federal law enforcement assistance in quelling protests while pointing to ongoing demonstrations that have continued for weeks over the treatment of Black Americans by law enforcement.

Republican filth

GOP set to release controversial Biden report

Republicans are preparing to release a report in a matter of days on their investigation focused on former Vice President Joe Biden and his son Hunter Biden, a move they hope will put fresh scrutiny on the Democratic nominee just weeks from the election. The controversial probe, spearheaded by Sens. Ron Johnson (R-Wis.) and Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa), is focused broadly on Obama-era policy and Hunter Biden's work for Ukrainian gas company Burisma Holdings.

Corruption

Trump's nasty business with the Secret Service

President Trump’s luxury properties have charged the U.S. government more than $1.1 million in private transactions since Trump took office — including for room rentals at his Bedminster, N.J., club this spring while it was closed for the coronavirus pandemic, new documents show. The documents, including receipts and invoices from Trump’s businesses, were released by the Secret Service after The Washington Post filed a public-records lawsuit.

Breonna Taylor

Louisville officials agree to pay family $12m

The city of Louisville, Kentucky, has reached a $12m settlement with the family of Breonna Taylor in a civil suit stemming from the fatal shooting by police of the 26-year-old inside her apartment in March, according to reports.

Alexei Navalny

Poisoned Putin critic plans return to Russia

Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny on Tuesday posted a picture of himself from his hospital bed in Germany where he’s recuperating from being poisoned with a nerve agent, wryly joking about being able to breathe on his own.

Roger Stone

Martial law if Trump loses election

Roger Stone, whose 40-month prison sentence for lying to Congress and witness tampering in the Russia investigation was commuted by Donald Trump, has said Trump should seize total power and jail prominent figures including Bill and Hillary Clinton and Mark Zuckerberg if he loses to Joe Biden in November.

Microsoft

Russian hackers targeting US political campaigns

The same Russian military intelligence outfit that hacked the Democrats in 2016 has attempted similar intrusions into the computer systems of organizations involved in the 2020 elections, Microsoft said Thursday.

Shortnews

New York City

Spike in coronavirus infection rate

New York City is seeing a “very worrisome” sustained increase in Covid-19 infections across the five boroughs, Mayor Bill de Blasio and public health officials said Thursday. The city’s positive test rate hit 1.92 percent based on a seven-day average, the highest number in weeks and the first time the metric has seen a "meaningful jump" since the city began tracking it in September, de Blasio said. The one-day rate was even higher, at 2.7 percent.

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New York City

Spike in coronavirus infection rate

New York City is seeing a “very worrisome” sustained increase in Covid-19 infections across the five boroughs, Mayor Bill de Blasio and public health officials said Thursday. The city’s positive test rate hit 1.92 percent based on a seven-day average, the highest number in weeks and the first time the metric has seen a "meaningful jump" since the city began tracking it in September, de Blasio said. The one-day rate was even higher, at 2.7 percent.

The city reported 532 new coronavirus cases — a number that has been hovering around the city’s 550 threshold for keeping the pandemic under control, which it breached earlier this week. While previous spikes were driven by outbreaks confined to certain neighborhoods in Brooklyn and Queens, officials now say new cases are increasing across the city.

“We do see a slow and steady rise throughout many, many parts of the city,” said public health adviser Jay Varma.

The city plans to shut down its school system, which has reopened in fits and starts, if the positive test rate on a seven day average hits 3 percent. The mayor has called for shutting down indoor dining if it hits 2 percent, though the final decision would rest with Gov. Andrew Cuomo.

No Russian citizenship

Snowden given permanent residency in Russia

Edward Snowden, the former National Security Agency (NSA) contractor charged with espionage in 2013, was granted permanent residency in Russia, according to multiple reports. Snowden has lived in Russia since 2013 to avoid prosecution in the United States. He was charged after releasing classified documents on American surveillance programs.

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No Russian citizenship

Snowden given permanent residency in Russia

Edward Snowden, the former National Security Agency (NSA) contractor charged with espionage in 2013, was granted permanent residency in Russia, according to multiple reports. Snowden has lived in Russia since 2013 to avoid prosecution in the United States. He was charged after releasing classified documents on American surveillance programs.

“Today, Snowden was handed a residency permit for an unlimited period of time,” Snowden’s attorney Anatoly Kucherena told Russia’s state Tass news agency, The Associated Press reported.

Kucherena also told the Interfax news agency that his application was submitted in April, but approval was delayed due to the lockdowns amid the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, according to the AP.

The attorney also said Snowden is not currently applying for Russian citizenship.

The whistleblower has previously said he is willing to return to the U.S. if he is guaranteed a fair trial.

Snowden last month agreed to pay over $5 million in profits from his book and speaking fees to the U.S. government. A federal judge ruled in favor of the Justice Department in a lawsuit filed against Snowden arguing that his autobiography violated a nondisclosure agreement.

As of last month, Snowden had earned over $4.2 million from the book sales.

President Trump earlier this year said he was considering a pardon for Snowden, telling reporters at a news conference that “There are many, many people — it seems to be a split decision that many people think that he should be somehow treated differently, and other people think he did very bad things.”

COVID 19: Idaho

School teachers go on strike

Hundreds of school teachers in an Idaho district have gone on strike over an uptick in local COVID-19 outbreaks. Over 700 educators in the West Ada School District called out sick Monday, leading to more than 400 teachers calling out sick on Tuesday after the district said it would proceed with some in-person and virtual learning, a local ABC affiliate KSAW-LD reported.

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COVID 19: Idaho

School teachers go on strike

Hundreds of school teachers in an Idaho district have gone on strike over an uptick in local COVID-19 outbreaks. Over 700 educators in the West Ada School District called out sick Monday, leading to more than 400 teachers calling out sick on Tuesday after the district said it would proceed with some in-person and virtual learning, a local ABC affiliate KSAW-LD reported.

Teachers joined the strike after the district moved to proceed with learning sessions despite warnings by Central District Health (CDH) that Ada County was considered a coronavirus "red" zone, indicating a significant threat of possible virus transmissions.

"When is enough, enough? If red is not the line, where is the line?" said West Ada teacher Zach Borman.

Borman represents one of the roughly 700 teachers who called out sick on Monday.

"I would basically argue I am sick; this has been the most stressful and terrifying thing of my life," said Borman, adding that he is grading papers while voicing caution about the current COVID-19 threat in the school district.

The West Ada teachers union said it disagreed with the school board's plan to continue some in-person classes amid the district's rising safety risks, Idaho Press reported.

The decision to strike was met with backlash by users on social media, voicing dissatisfaction and critiquing the teachers who called out sick Monday.

"The lack of empathy, you can see it too just scrolling out on Facebook, to see some of those comments directed at them is heartbreaking," said Chelsey McGee, a a parent in the school district.

Borman has voiced his concerns during board meetings and via rounds of email, saying the hybrid learning the school has performed this semester is too risky given the current health guidance.

Some critics questioned the impact it would have on the students attempting to learn while navigating the pandemic's complex logistics.

"I don't think there's a single teacher in this district that's still in this district that doesn't care greatly about the education of their students," said Borman, adding, "I'm insulted by anyone that is assuming I'm doing this because I don't care about kids' education."

CDH reported a trend of rising infections throughout Ada County in early September.

On Oct. 11, the county recorded 548 cases and 23 new cases on Oct. 18, though some data could still be missing from more recent updates.

Since the outset of the pandemic, 157 fatalities due to COVID-19 have been recorded in the county.

COVID-19

Trump calls 200,000 deaths in U.S. ‘a shame’

The coronavirus death toll in the United States surpassed 200,000 on Tuesday, marking another milestone of loss at a time when many have become numb to the rising fatality count. The tally represents the upper boundary of a fatality range that President Trump in March said would signal that his administration had “done a very good job” of protecting Americans from the coronavirus. As he left the White House for Pennsylvania on Tuesday evening, Trump responded to a reporter’s question about the 200,000 deaths, saying, “It’s a shame.”

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COVID-19

Trump calls 200,000 deaths in U.S. ‘a shame’

Florida Voting

Bloomberg pays fines for 32,000 felons

Billionaire Michael Bloomberg has reportedly raised more than $16 million in an effort to help convicted felons in Florida register to vote. The Florida Rights Restoration Coalition estimated Bloomberg's fundraising push has already paid off monetary obligations for 32,000 felons, Axios reported. "The right to vote is fundamental to our democracy and no American should be denied that right," a Bloomberg spokesperson told the news outlet.

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Florida Voting

Bloomberg pays fines for 32,000 felons

Billionaire Michael Bloomberg has reportedly raised more than $16 million in an effort to help convicted felons in Florida register to vote. The Florida Rights Restoration Coalition estimated Bloomberg's fundraising push has already paid off monetary obligations for 32,000 felons, Axios reported. "The right to vote is fundamental to our democracy and no American should be denied that right," a Bloomberg spokesperson told the news outlet.

"Working together with the Florida Rights Restoration Coalition, we are determined to end disenfranchisement and the discrimination that has always driven it."

Florida passed a law in 2018 reinstating voting rights for felons that dictated they could register only if they pay all fines, fees and restitution — sometimes totaling more than $1,000 — owed to the government.

The 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, which covers Florida, last week ruled to uphold the law.

Last week, several television networks also pledged to donate money to the cause.

Bloomberg, who ran in the Democratic primary for president, has endorsed the party's nominee, Joe Biden, and has donated at least $100 million to the former vice president's campaign to defeat President Trump.